Suzi Zutic

bouquets of exotic gemstones | the finest precious metals | passionately created | handcrafted

Beyond Extravagance : A Royal Collection of Gems and Jewels

I have finally ordered my copy of this amazing publication from Assouline, “Beyond Extravagance: A Royal Collection of Gems and Jewels”. The book presents a journey of over 400 years of important jewels and objects from India, from opulent court jewels to commissions from some of the wealthiest Maharajas.

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It is on the slightly pricey side, however, if you are interested in purchasing a copy, the following link offers a good introduction and a peek inside !

There's an interesting interview with the author, Dr. Amin Jaffer, who is also the International Director of Asian Art at Christies.

Until my copy arrives, I thought id introduce you to a few of my favorite Maharajas and the mode of transport for the female members of the royal household.

 

 

Maharaja of Rewa (Now in Madhya Pradesh) - 1877. A rather austere looking chap.  

Maharaja of Rewa (Now in Madhya Pradesh) - 1877. A rather austere looking chap.

 

Maharaja Bhupindar Singh was very fond of jewellery and was one of Cartier's regular clients.

Maharaja Bhupindar Singh was very fond of jewellery and was one of Cartier's regular clients.

Silver zenana carriage at Baroda, Gujarat from the Curzon Collection, 1890s.Photographer unknown. The enclosed carriage ensured the seclusion of female members of the royal household when travelling. The lavishly decorated two-wheeled carriage is drawn by caparisoned bullocks and belonged to Gaekwar Sayaji Rao III (ruled 1875-1939), 12th Maharaja of Baroda. He owned a collection of exotic transport, which also included golden carriages and a miniature carriage drawn by deer.

Silver zenana carriage at Baroda, Gujarat from the Curzon Collection, 1890s.Photographer unknown. The enclosed carriage ensured the seclusion of female members of the royal household when travelling. The lavishly decorated two-wheeled carriage is drawn by caparisoned bullocks and belonged to Gaekwar Sayaji Rao III (ruled 1875-1939), 12th Maharaja of Baroda. He owned a collection of exotic transport, which also included golden carriages and a miniature carriage drawn by deer.